Julia Turner is editor-in-chief of Slate.

“That’s what we’ve been focused on: trying to double down on the stuff that feels distinctive and original. Because if you spend all your time on a social platform, and a bunch of media brands are optimizing all their content for that social platform, all those media brands’ headlines say the same, all the content is pretty interchangeable. It turns media into this commodity where then what is the point of developing a media company for 20 years? You might as well take the Silicon Valley approach and just make a new one every three years for whatever that moment is.”

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Direct download: Ep._212_-_Julia_Turner.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:07pm EST

Naomi Zeichner is editor-in-chief of The Fader.

“Right now in rap there’s kind of a huge tired idea that kids are trying to kill their idols, and kids have no respect for history, and kids are making bastardized crazy music, and how dare they? I just don’t even know why we still care about this false dichotomy. Kids are coming from where they come from, they’re going where they’re going. And it’s like, do you want to try to learn about where they’re coming from and where they’re going, or do you not?”

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Direct download: Ep._211_-_Naomi_Zeichner.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:51pm EST

Ben Taub is a contributing writer at The New Yorker.

“I don’t think it’s my place to be cynical because I’ve observed some of the horrors of the Syrian War through these various materials, but it’s Syrians that are living them. It’s Syrians that are being largely ignored by the international community and by a lot of political attention on ISIS. And I think that it wouldn’t be my place to be cynical when some of them still aren’t.”

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Direct download: Ep._210_-_Ben_Taub.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:20pm EST

Sarah Schweitzer is a former feature writer for the Boston Globe.

“I just am drawn, I think, to the notion that we start out as these creatures that just want love and were programmed that way—to try to find it and to make our lives whole. We are, as humans, so strong in that way. We get knocked down, and adults do some horrible things to us because adults have had horrible things done to [them]. There are some terrible cycles in this world. But there’s always this opportunity to stop that cycle. And there are people who come along who do try that in their own flawed ways.”

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Direct download: Ep._209_-_Sarah_Schweitzer.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:06pm EST

Rachel Monroe is a freelance writer based in Texas.

“I will totally go emotionally deep with people. If I can find a subject who is into that then it will probably be a good story. Whether that person is a victim of a crime, or a committer of a crime, or a woman who spends a lot of time on the internet looking for hoaxes, or whatever it may be—I guess I just think people are interesting. Particularly when those people have gone through some sort of extreme situation.”

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Direct download: Ep._208_-_Rachel_Monroe.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:02am EST

McKay Coppins is a senior political writer for Buzzfeed News and the author of The Wilderness: Deep Inside the Republican Party's Combative, Contentious, Chaotic Quest to Take Back the White House.

“I am part of the problem. Not in the sense that it’s my fault Trump ran, but in the sense that I’m one of many who for his entire life have mocked him and ridiculed him. He’s a billionaire—I don’t feel any moral guilt about it. But if being I’m honest with myself that same part of me can also, when not checked, be projected onto vast swathes of people. It’s easy to have a lazy classism about the type of people who would vote for Donald Trump.”

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Show Notes:

Direct download: Ep_207_-_McKay_Coppins.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:59pm EST

<p>Gabriel Sherman is the national affairs editor at <em>New York</em> and the author of the <em>New York Times</em> best-seller <em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Loudest-Voice-Room-Brilliant-News/dp/0812992857?tag=longform-20" target="_blank">The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News—and Divided a Country</a></em>.</p>

<p><blockquote>“There was a time when we got death threats at home. Some crank called and said, ‘We’re gonna come after you. You’re coming after the right, we’re gonna get you.’ That was scary because, again, you don’t know if it’s just a crank when you have right wing websites that are turning you into a target. You know, it’s one thing if they do it with a politician. They have security or handlers—I don’t have any of that.”</blockquote></p>

<p><em>Thanks to <a href="http://mailchimp.com/" target="_blank">MailChimp</a> and <a href="http://www.audiblepodcast.com/longform" target="_blank">Audible</a> for sponsoring this week's episode.</em></p>

Direct download: Ep._206_-_Gabriel_Sherman.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:09pm EST

Jon Mooallem is the author of "American Hippopotamus," a story included in Love and Ruin, the new Atavist Magazine collection. Buy your copy today.

Direct download: Ep._74_-_Jon_Mooallem_-_Love_and_Ruin.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00am EST

Ezra Klein the editor-in-chief of Vox.

“I think that if any of these big players collapse, when their obits are written, it’ll be because they did too much. I’m not saying I think any of them in particular are doing too much. But I do think, when I look around and I think, ‘What is the danger here? What is the danger for Vox?’ I think it is losing too much focus because you’re trying to do too many things.”

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Direct download: Ep._205_-_Ezra_Klein.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:42pm EST

Malcolm Gladwell is a staff writer at The New Yorker. His new podcast is Revisionist History.

“The amount of criticism you get is a constant function of the size of your audience. So if you think that, generously speaking, 80% of the people who read your work like it, that means if you sell ten books you have two enemies. And if you sell a million books you have 200,000 enemies. So be careful what you wish for. The volume of critics grows linearly with the size of your audience.”

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Direct download: Ep._204_-_Malcolm_Gladwell.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:49pm EST